Stories of Faith Scams

Stories of Faith ScamsClergy scams are not new in society, and many devoted believers still fall prey to these scams. The scammers often conduct their transgressions by posing as religious leaders. They then persuade unsuspecting congregants into spending money (hundreds of dollars) on gift cards (allegedly for someone in need) and disappear after successfully swindling a victim.

 

They Steal the Identity Clergy

Faith scams are not limited to a given faith group; they happen across all faiths and the United States. Religious scammers have swindled Christians, Jews, Catholics, protestants, Buddhists and Muslims. Daniel, a rabbi aged 56 years, considers the act as sacrilegious. Since August, when he joined Congregation Ahavas Achim in New Hampshire, scammers have stolen his identity several times in scam attempts. Whenever this happens, the synagogue alerts its members xnxx. The rabbi once received news that a congregant was reportedly swindled about $600 in a gift-card scam. However, the victim, he says, refuses to be identified.

Stories of Faith Scams 

 

A Scammed Widow

On a February evening, A 60-year-old widow residing near Hattiesburg, Mississippi, received an email from a scammer impersonating her Christian pastor. The email appeared quite legit because the address closely resembled her pastor’s. The woman said the pastor (scammer) was out of town and needed a favor. The favor entailed buying $100 gift cards for five ladies undergoing cancer treatment. He specified Amazon and eBay cards and assured her he would pay back using cash or check. She hastily bought Amazon gift cards worth $500 at Walgreens and sent him the pictures of their numbers. The codes gave him instant access to the funds. However, the imposter did not stop there. That evening, the scammer texted requesting more cards, and the next morning he said he wanted ten $100 gift cards. At this moment, she suspected him and sent him a text calling him a liar and a thief. The text (full of furry) warned the fraudster that God was watching his actions. The widow says that the loss she incurred would derail her dream of buying her home. Despite the numerous failed attempts, this is the first time she has fallen for a scam.

 

A Widespread Menace

Many people can attest to comparable scams. Facebook has numerous posts from religious leaders advising their congregants to disregard sham emails sent in their names. An instance occurred in April 2020, when the Southwest Conference of the United Church of Christ encouraged members to remain vigilant concerning emails from church leaders. According to the church, suspicious messages often request some unusual action like wiring money or purchasing gift cards. The Phoenix-based organization noted that email scams had hit several congregations, including its conference. News sources point out that catholic parishes in Ohio and synagogues in Nevada, North Carolina, Tennessee, Mary Land, and New Jersey have been targeted. An 80-year-old woman from Delray Beach, Florida, bought a gift card worth $10,500 for a person she supposed was her clergyman. In another incident, a 78-year-old man in Madison, Wisconsin, bought $900 in gift cards for a man he was convinced was his pastor.

 

Scammed by Televangelist

Some clergymen swindle their poor congregants through the gospel of prosperity. Most of them are televangelists and often refer to money as seed. If viewers plant some amount, they will receive the seed amount in multiple amounts. The faithful followers are taught that they are investing in their faith and future. In 2011, Larry (a desperate viewer), residing in California, watched different prosperity preachers on TV. These scammers openly link wealth and religion. He fell for one who appeared compelling and assured quick returns. He appeared a result-oriented preacher, and Larry needed fast returns. It was tough for him and his family. He, alongside his daughter, was sick, his business was struggling, and his car and van broke down irreparably in the same week. He sold his van to a local junkyard at $600. He thought of investing it as seed, and yes, he did so and waited for his miracle. While the compelling speeches created hope in him, Larry now knows that donated cash would not multiply

 

 

 

 

Lifelong learning in action

Lifelong learning is both a vision shared by all the European countries and, within countries, by all the actors involved in education and training. Lifelong learning has become a guiding principle for provision and participation across all learning contexts and is expected to drive fundamental change in education and training. It is also a conceptual framework for thinking about education and training.

The European countries are currently moving from formulating policies to the implementation of strategies for lifelong learning, contributing to a successful transition to a knowledge-based economy and society

To achieve this, the vision and the concept need to be transformed into comprehensive strategies which, in turn, will lead to operational policies, programmes and initiatives in schools, universities, companies, local authorities and other institutions in civil society.

However a broad range of definitions and interpretations co-exist, which leads to very different approaches to implementation. Within the domain of training and employment policies, over recent years, lifelong learning has increasingly been the “label” given to sets of measures implemented in order to reform or adapt existing provision in response to the needs of a changing labour market. Whether or not this implies the existence of a policy of lifelong learning or a strategic vision may be debatable. Has the term “lifelong learning” been, at least to some extent, a useful shorthand for a range of aims, enabling objectives, structures, etc.

On the other hand the debate about “lifelong learning” has acted as a powerful stimulus to find solutions to improve access to learning, link up disconnected segments of the education and training systems, integrate a range of personal, social and economic objectives, reflect on issues of funding and organisation, etc.

Our Objective

Our objective is to present major issues concerning the development and implementation of strategies for lifelong learning. It is a vast arena and so we have decided to select specific issues for exploration and reflection. In order to build up a dossier which takes account of the impressive range of experiences and approaches, we strongly encourage you to send contributions to this site: innovative experiences (at local, sectoral, institutional, etc. levels …), problems seeking solutions, points of reflection, etc..

This dossier aims to provide a tool for practitioners, policy-makers and researchers, for an exchange of information, comment, innovative experiences and reflection. We will undertake the synthesis of your contributions for inclusion on this site and bring to the debate our expertise based on the projects and initiative in which the REDCOM partners are involved

What will you find in this dossier ?

At this pilot stage, we are launching the dossier focusing on some of the specific groups concerned by the development of Lifelong Education (Adults, Disadvantaged Learners and Young People). At a later stage we will also include pages focusing on the challenges to higher education, the school system and others aspects.

National and regional experiences will be presented as illustrative examples of lifelong learning in action selected in different European countries. They will provide the opportunity to examine interesting experiences and to react by submitting comments or by contributing other experiences.

Forthcoming in this dossier:

As the dossier develops there will be a portfolio of materials, which will allow you to select your entry point by :

• Major issues about lifelong learning (access, financing, organisation of the learning, objectives…)
• The different groups concerned by Lifelong learning
• The different levels of responsibility for lifelong learning policies (EU, national for the moment, and later also regional, sectoral and institutional policies and strategies)

For each point of entry we will provide links to relevant porno pages on the policies and processes of EU policy making, national or regional policies, articles in journals and other recent publications, relevant sites…